Need some help using some of the available resources? Find walkthroughs and tutorials not only on how to make the most of the apps that are available to you with your library card, but for some common tools found on the Internet as well.

Libby - Ebooks and e-audiobooks provided by OverDrive

Check out ebooks and e-audiobooks on your computer here.
Download the Libby app for your iPhone or iPad here, or download the app for Android here.

Video transcript as follows:

Meet Libby, the free one-tap reading app from your library.

With Libby, you can borrow free ebooks and digital audiobooks from your library. All you need is a library card.

When you open Libby for the first time, she'll help you find your library. Then, you can explore your library's collection and borrow titles or place holds instantly.

On your Shelf, you'll find all your loans and holds, as well as any titles you've tagged.

Loans are automatically downloaded for offline use when you're on Wi-Fi. If you're using mobile data, you can stream titles until you're on Wi-Fi.

Your loans are returned automatically on their due dates, so you never need to worry about late fees.

Tap Manage Loan to see more options for each title (like returning early).

Tap a title to open it and start reading. If you belong to a library in the United States, you'll see the option to send most ebooks to Kindle or to start reading in Libby.

Use the bottom navigation to switch between your Shelf, your library, and your current read.

In the Libby menu, you can add a library, change your app settings, get help, and more.

Download Libby to start borrowing today. Happy reading!

Mango Languages - Learn a new language at your own pace

Check out Mango Languages here.

Video transcript as follows:

If you’ve already created a profile, you can login anytime at mangolanguages.com, up here in the top right where it says Log In. Once you enter your username or email, and password - click Log In.
Here you’ll see our learning portal, with navigation tabs on the top, and our language content below. In the top left, you can resume where you left off, or start your review cards, which we’ll talk about a little later. Below that we have a language placement test, our main units of content, and an assessment exam. And for some languages, we even have Specialty Units, where you can expand your vocabulary and conversations in themed courses.
In the main section of the screen, we have our learning content broken up by chapters and lessons. Each of our lessons are in bite-sized chunks, and take anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes to complete.
After that, you’ll see our Listening and Reading activities, a Recap of all the phrases within the chapter, and then a Quiz to test your knowledge! You can see each of our chapters are topic-based, covering a wide variety of conversations.
Now I’ve studied a bit of French, but let’s say I wanted to switch the language I’m learning. If you navigate up to the top left corner, and click on the language icon, our language selection panel appears. Here, you can find your recent languages, our most popular languages, and all of the over 70 world languages Mango has to offer.
Let’s select Spanish (Latin American). So I’ll click on it, and then click Resume. And here we see our learning portal for Spanish. Let’s navigate to a lesson!
On this screen, you’ll see the conversational and grammar goals we’ll cover in the chapter. These include what you’ll be able to do in conversations; Asking someone’s name, introducing yourself, etc., and what you’ll learn from a grammar standpoint. On the next screen, you’ll hear a full conversation between native speakers. Don’t worry if it sounds like a lot, we break things down part by part in the subsequent lessons.
"Hola, me llamo Maria."
"¿Como se llama usted?"
"Me llamo Tom. Es un gusto conocerla."
"Igualmente, Tom."
Now on this screen we have two options: we can either replay the entire conversation, or we can listen to specific lines, by clicking on them.
"Es un gusto conocerlo."
Let’s continue! We start with a single sentence, and every slide in Mango is full of interactive features. You can hover over the words in the language to see a phonetic popup, and click to hear the word pronounced at a slower, more articulated pace.
"usted"
Or click on the speaker icon to hear the entire sentence at a conversational pace.
"¿Como se llama usted?"
You’ll see another neat function, our literal & understood meanings! While right now, this sentence is what’s understood, clicking here allows you to see how the sentence is literally translated. And now you’ll see the magic of Mango’s use of color. It allows you to see which words match to where. We call this semantic color mapping. Next we’ll start to break down the sentence, and again, all our slides have the same interactive features!
And now, let’s take a look at another feature, Voice Comparison. Voice comparison allows you to record your voice, and match up the waveform to a native speaker! I’ll click here and record my voice:
"llamarse"
You can click and drag to adjust your waveform, and you can click to hear the Narrator’s voice, your voice, or hear them both together. On this slide, you see one of Mango’s grammar notes, that we sprinkle throughout lessons, so you can learn right in context. Even these words are interactive, as here we learn a little bit about reflexive verbs.
Next, we’ll start to learn through repetition. You can click on the timer to pause, or click Show Answer to reveal the answer! Now we’ll start to learn a little more, and you can see the power of Mango’s semantic color mapping in action! Do you remember what this was?
"usted se llama"
Next, we’ll learn how to say, 'How.'
"como"
And now, we’ll put everything all back together.
"¿Como se llama usted?"
Even when things seem tricky, we help explain so you’re never lost.
Next, we have another type of note, a Cultural Note. These help to give a little context of culture around the world related to the language you’re learning.
Let’s introduce one more thing!
"te llamas"
And now, all on your own, how would you ask,
"What is your name?"
"¿Como te llamas?"
Mango helps to give you all the building blocks to build up a language, and intuitively put it together.
Up on the top right, you have your keyboard controls, help and support, and your settings. Or in the top left, you can exit at anytime!
Now we also have our Listening and Reading activities. Available in our more common languages,These provide you with a passage, and multiple-choice questions to test your knowledge and comprehension. These passages are completely different, to maximize your learning.
Over on the left hand side, you’ll see the area for Daily Review. These are vocabulary you’ve previously studied, brought up at key times by Mango’s spaced repetition system,
making sure you have things committed to memory. As you go through your review cards, you can click to see the answer, and respond if you get the answers correct or not,
allowing Mango to customize your learning experience around you!
Some languages also have an Explore tab, where you can view Mango Movies in your language, along with Little Pim video lessons, for younger learners. And Tools allow you to find a translation function.
In the top right corner, you’ll find your profile settings, including where to create up to 5 family profiles, and where to log out. And, if you have any other questions, feel free to reach out to our support team at support.mangolanguages.com.
Auto Repair Source - Learn how to fix your own vehicle

Check out Auto Repair Source here.

Video transcript as follows:

Designed for touch-enabled devices such as laptops and tablets, Auto Repair Source offers a user-friendly search experience and access to a wealth of information to help users diagnose, repair and maintain today's complex vehicles. In this tutorial, we look at how to search for vehicles in Auto Repair Source to locate topics such as maintenance and repair information, parts and labor information, wiring diagrams, and more.
Let’s begin by searching for a vehicle. From the Auto Repair Source home page, select the year of the vehicle you wish to research. Next, select the vehicle’s make, model and engine type. The Topics Menu on the left displays a list of available Repair Topics relevant to your search including Maintenance Info, Technical Service Bulletins, Specifications, and Diagrams. You can search within all of the available topics by entering keywords in the search box and clicking the magnifying glass. The results are listed by topic on the right. Or, you can browse for information available within the topics by clicking a heading. Select a sub-heading to keep refining your search or click on a document to view it.
To print content from Auto Repair Source, click the Print Options drop-down and select to print the text only version, or when available, select to print the text and images. After making your selection, click the Printer icon. Complete the print process using your browser’s print dialog box.
You can also use Auto Repair Source to look up Parts and Labor times. Select Parts & Labor from the menu on the left and then select either Parts or Labor. Use the drop-down menus to make your selections. After making your selections, the parts or labor times and associated costs are displayed below. Click the Select New Vehicle button to begin a new vehicle search in Auto Repair Source.
You can view your vehicle search history for the current session by clicking Menu, and then clicking the Search History link. Also from the Menu options, you can click the Feedback link to send feedback to MOTOR about the vehicle you are viewing.
For more information, visit EBSCO Connect at https://connect.ebsco.com.
Business Insights: Essentials - In-depth information on businesses, industries, and products

Check out Business Insights: Essentials here.

Video transcript as follows:

Business Insights: Essentials enables researchers to quickly and easily search for companies, industries, and more, and provides detailed company and industry profiles, including SWOT reports, market share reports, and financial reports, company histories and industry essays, scholarly journals and business news for deep research coverage of U.S. businesses, industries, and products.
On the Business Insights homepage, and in the banner of all other pages, you’ll find a search box. Use this search box to perform basics searches. Simply enter a company name or ticker symbol, a country name, an industry description, a SIC or NAICS code, a product or brand name, or a topic. Next, select the type of search you want to perform from the pull-down menu. Check the check box to limit your search to full-text documents, and then click search.
Let's try another search! To perform more complex search queries, use Advanced Search. Your search term and any limiters you may have used are displayed at the top of the page. Click the "X" next to the search limiter to undo that piece of the search. Use the pull-down menu to sort your results by publication date, by article title, by publication title, or by relevance.
Use the search box to further search within your current results. Use the links along the left of the page to narrow your results. For example, if you're only interested in company histories, select company histories from the content type list. Or, limit your results to full-text documents, to peer-reviewed documents, by publication date, by subject, or to content from a specific publication. The number of items found for each is displayed.
Click the star icon to save a document and return to it later. Select the saved items tab from the menu bar to view a document you've saved. From your saved times list, you can print, email, or generate a bookmark for the document that you can save, cut and paste into another document, or email to yourself or someone else. First, check the check box next to the document name, and then select an operation.
Select the Search History tab from the menu bar to view a list of searches you've conducted. Click the hyperlinked search expression to re-execute a search from the list. Click the revise link to modify a search. From here you can revise the search as needed.
Select the glossary tab from the menu bar to use the business glossary to look up unfamiliar business terms. From here, browse the alphabetical list, or enter a term in the search box to look up a specific term.
FamilySearch - An easy, free tool for genealogy and family history

Check out FamilySearch here. Get more local genealogy resources here.

Video transcript as follows:
Here are three sources of family history information you should consider as you get started with your family.
Memory
Take a moment, and try to remember as much as you can, and then jot it down. Record the information by family. This will give you an idea of the information you know and the information you will need to discover.
Home
You may have documents that have been passed on to you that you have forgotten about. Look for them in drawers, filing cabinets, attics, bookshelves, and basements.
Look for letters, diaries, journals, certificates, and legal documents. Newspaper clippings, and obituaries that might list your ancestor’s next of kin. Look in places where family names may have been recorded, such as on pages in a family Bible or inscriptions on heirlooms. Look for old photographs, and check the backs for information.
Relatives
Talk to your relatives. They may be able to share stories and information with you. Begin with your oldest relatives. Contact them, and explain why you are collecting information. Then schedule a time you can visit with them. Send some questions ahead of time so your relatives can collect their thoughts and make copies of important documents for you. Recording or video taping your visit is a good idea too. But keep things simple so your relatives don’t feel self conscious. During your visit, take good notes. To help break the ice show your relatives photographs or documents and ask them to describe the people and events they depict. Use the information you jotted down from memory, and try to fill in any missing information. Ask for full names; maiden names; birth, marriage, and death information; and memorable stories. Avoid questions that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” Instead, ask questions that will encourage your relatives to share facts and stories. Ask questions that begin with “What memories do you have…” or, “Can you tell me about…” Ask your relatives if they have information they would be willing to share with you, such as old documents and photographs. Finally, ask for the names of other relatives or people that you can visit. You may want to ask your relative to let the other people know that you will be contacting them.
To learn more about collecting information, go to Step 1 of our website, and look in the Additional Resources section.

Check out FamilySearch here. Get more local genealogy resources here.

Video transcript as follows:

You may come across ancestors that you know very little about. Their lives are like puzzles. Just waiting to be solved. There are two good principles for finding information about you puzzling ancestors. The first principle is to try to find information about your most recent ancestors and then work back in time. Start by finding information about your parents and uncles and aunts, then your grandparents, and then your great-grandparents. The second principle is to look for information on a record that will lead to other records. For example, you can look on your father’s birth record to find your grandfather’s name listed as a parent. Then you can find his birth record where you can discover the name of your great-grandfather. This process of looking for information on one record that leads to another is a key strategy in preparing a family history.
Records and the Information They Contain
The keys to discovering you puzzling ancestors may be found in public records that are kept by governments, religious organizations, and other record keeping institutions. From a birth record you can discover your ancestor’s full maiden name, her date and place of birth, and the names of her parents. A government census record can tell you where she lived and in some cases, the names of other people in her family. From a marriage record you can learn her age and the name of her husband. Newspaper articles may give you important information about events in her life and the times in which she lived. A death record or an obituary can provide the names of her children and other relatives. Using the bits and pieces of information you’ve found on different records you can reconstruct your ancestor’s life and share it with others. It’s important to know that birth, marriage, and death records are sometimes called vital records. Many times vital records can be found through the vital records offices of local governments.
How to Find Records
When you start searching for records, we recommend that you begin at FamilySearch.org. It’s a non-profit website where you can search for records free of charge. FamilySearch.org can instantly search through many different record collections containing hundreds of millions of records. If the records you are looking for aren’t available at FamilySearch.org you may want to visit a family history center in your area. These small, genealogical libraries are free to the public. They are staffed by volunteers who can try to help you find records for your ancestors. Family history Centers have access to the world’s largest collection of records on microfilm that are not available on any website. While you are there, you can also use a variety of commercial websites free of charge. Most family history centers are located in meetinghouses of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. No proselyting is conducted at a center. To learn more about finding records, or to locate a family history center near you, go to Step 3 of our website and look in the Additional Resources section.

Check out FamilySearch here. Get more local genealogy resources here.

Video transcript as follows:

As you do your family history, you will probably have to search for records that contain information about your ancestors. An excellent place to start is at www.FamilySearch.org. It's a family history website that has compiled hundreds of millions of records that you can search free of charge.
Tips for Entering Information
Here are some tips for finding information at FamilySearch.org. Suppose you are trying to find records about your great-aunt. Start by entering a complete name. For a woman, try using her married name. This is the name that will appear on records after she was married such as census or death records. Next, estimate your ancestor’s life span, and then increase it by five years. Do this even if you know the exact dates because they may have been recorded incorrectly when the records were entered into the computer. Add the locations where you think your ancestor was born and died. Click the Search button and a list of records appears.
These are records that might have information about your ancestor. The records are not listed in alphabetical order. They are listed by how closely they match the information you entered. On many records, you will see a camera icon. This means that you can see a digital copy of the actual record. Scroll through the list until you find a record that you think is for your ancestor. Click on the person’s name to see the record. Study it to see if it has the information that you are looking for. You can click on the image to see the actual record. Use the Zoom box to see more detail.
Revising a Search
If you don’t find information about your ancestor on your first search, revise it, and try again. Here are some tips:
  • For a woman, enter her maiden name because that’s the name that will be listed on birth and marriage records.
  • Try using different spellings of a name because spelling conventions have changed over the years. You can also try different variations of a name. Oftentimes immigrants altered their names to ease the transition into their new country.
  • Finally, if you can’t find records about a person, try searching for records about a family member. For example, suppose you couldn’t find any records for Jonathan Hughes. You could try searching for information about his son, Thomas. FamilySearch.org might find a census record with Thomas listed as the son, and Jonathan listed as the father.
Gale General OneFile - Find authoritative information

Check out Gale General OneFile here.

Video transcript as follows:

Magazines and newspapers allow you to stay on top of the latest news, and quickly explore topics of interest. Gale General OneFile brings together thousands of magazines and newspapers so that you
can unlock the power of an entire newsstand from your laptop.
You can start with a Basic Search across thousands of periodicals, or select the Advanced Search to search for all articles from a specific title included in General OneFile. You can sort through results to find the latest articles. Use the Search Within bar to find a regular feature or topic covered in the publication, or select options to discover articles matched to your interests.
It's easy to keep track of useful articles for later viewing. You can even send articles to an existing Google or Microsoft account so that you can stay organized as you collect information to support your skills and hobbies.
If you want to view issues of a publication, simply click the publication title. This feature connects you with all of the articles from recent and back issues of magazines and journals.
You can even use the Create Journal Alert feature to set up an email notification alerting you each time the next issue is available, so that you can easily keep up with the latest from your favorite periodicals.
Email - How to set up an account and send emails
Facebook - Connecting with friends online
Zoom - Meetings and video calls

Download the Zoom app for your computer here. Download the Zoom app for your iPhone or iPad here, or your Android here.

Download the Zoom app for your computer here. Download the Zoom app for your iPhone or iPad here, or your Android here.