Outreach

The CEFLS Outreach Department coordinates funds from the New York State Library to extend library services to special populations. From visually impaired to the geographically isolated, we offer solutions and services that help everyone enjoy the benefits of a library. Services to these “target groups” are provided by CEFLS and/or local public libraries.


Developmentally/Learning Disabled

A person who was born with a chronic condition that is due to mental or physical impairments or is affected by a disorder which may affect the acquisition, organization, retention, understanding or use of verbal or nonverbal information.

Autism Resources Visit our Infostream with news, community resources, websites and books about autism.

Also see New York State's Special Education page. The NY Office of Special Education works to promote educational equity and excellence for students with disabilities, and the page contains helpful information for parents and educators.

 


Educationally Disadvantaged

A person who requires special services and assistance to enable them to succeed in higher education.

Pathways to SuccessOutreach - Pathways to Success is a booklet designed for adult new learners looking for more resources to educational and economic success by the Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System with supporting funds from the New York State Library's Adult Literacy Library Services Program. The booklet is available at libraries and as a PDF on our website.     Click here for easy access to local literacy providers  and our favorite literacy pages that are great for adult new learners and tutors!

Outreach - DigitalLearn

If you are new to computers, haven't used them for a while, are a little unsure and uncomfortable, or just need a bit of a refresher, we have the tools to help you tackle technology at your own pace and gain the confidence you need to succeed. Go to DigitalLearn.org today!


Ethnic Minorities in Need of Special Services

A person or group that has different national or cultural traditions from the main population (including non-English speakers).

Outreach - Google Translate Google Translate is Google’s free language translation service available on Android™ devices and iOS™ devices. You can seamlessly translate between 90 languages with text. It also features a two-way automatic speech translation in 40 languages, hands-free. Drawn characters can be translated without the use of an onscreen keyboard and you can translate signs with your phone or tablet’s camera.  


Geographically Isolated

A person or group that is divided from the rest of the population as a result of a physical barrier.


Physically Handicapped

A person with a loss or failure to develop a specific bodily function or functions, whether of movement, sensation, coordination, or speech, but excluding mental impairments or disabilities.

Outreach - ADA

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became law in 1990. The ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public. The purpose of the law is to make sure that people with disabilities have the same rights and opportunities as everyone else.

The ADA National Network consists of 10 regional centers and an ADA Knowledge Translation Center. The regional centers are distributed throughout the United States to provide local assistance and foster implementation of the ADA. Take a look at some of the useful fact sheets they provide as well.

ADA Building Federal Guidelines

Interior Specifications on ADA Designed Libraries

ADA Programming Ideas

Policy Statement from the ALA

New York Library Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Do you want to listen to the newspaper on the radio? Would a book holder make your life easier? How about a closed captioned decoder or a magnifying sheet? Do you have a question about current ADA standards or local services for the physically handicapped? Call (518) 563-5190 to find out more!

An updated “Guide to Library Services” is available on the website of the New York State Talking Book and Braille Library. This is a brief, two-page introduction to using talking book services and what to expect when registration is completed.

The NYSTBBL is a great free service for patrons who are not able to use traditional print materials. Please see the New York State Library Talking Book and Braille Library website for a guide and other promotional materials. If you have questions about the service, please contact Karen Batchelder at CEFLS by calling (518) 561-5190 ext. 20 or email her at kbatchelder@cefls.org.

Respect for People with Disabilities Did you know? When writing about or interacting with a person with a disability, it's always best to use "person first language" since individuals should not be defined by their disability. For example, "we have a wheelchair patron" should be "We have a patron who uses a wheelchair". And, people are not "wheelchair bound", rather the "use a wheelchair."

Since 1984 the Research and Training Center on Independent Living (RTC/IL) has distributed more than 1 million copies of its groundbreaking style sheet, Guidelines: How to Write and Report About People with Disabilities. You can find a printable poster summarizing the information here.


Residents of Institutions

A person placed in an institution (such as an assisted living facility, nursing home, or hospital) that offers specialized care.

Outreach - Community ConnectionsCommunity Connections is a booklet designed for people returning to Clinton, Essex, or Franklin Counties from a correctional facility compiled by the Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System. It is made available to correctional facilities and at libraries as well as a PDF on our website.

 

Outreach - Reentry Education Tool Kit

Reentry Education Tool Kit This tool kit offers guidelines, tools, and resouces to help education providers implement the Reentry Education Framework that promotes the development of an education continuum spanning facility- and community-based reentry education programs.

Reentry Resource Center: New York New York State-based support network and information clearinghouse on prison, reentry, and the consequences of criminal proceedings. Covering the criminal process, education, employment, housing, civil rights, and much more, the Reentry Resource Center is a full of information available for free.


Senior

A person who may require special consideration due to advanced age.

Sites for Seniors Find the best websites for education as well as entertainment for seniors on the Internet compiled on our website. Featuring resources both on a local level and nationally all available free.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Older Adults: Tips for Caregivers Outreach - Dementia

Information and Support for In-Home Dementia Caregivers This educational series is designed to aid caregivers who are helping a loved one suffering from dementia. Follow Harold and Margaret as they face common issues surrounding dementia in-home care, including home safety, legal matters, dealing with problem behaviors and learning relaxation techniques.

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Microlearning training resources for the National Institute of Health's (NIH) Senior Health webpages.


Unemployed/Underemployed

A person without a paid job available to work/one who does not have enough paid work or not doing work that makes full use of their skills and abilities.

Outreach - Pathways to SuccessPathways to Success is a booklet designed for adult new learners looking for more resources to educational and economic success by the Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System with supporting funds from the New York State Library's Adult Literacy Library Services Program. The booklet is available at libraries and as a PDF on our website.

 

We also have an Infostream with local, regional and national job search and career resources.

   

Practical Skills for Working with Patrons Experiencing Homelessness by Ryan Dowd and Hesed House

Our Invisible Families: Library Services with Families Experiencing Homelessness by Vikki C. Terrile

People Experiencing Homelessness: How Libraries Can be Community Collaborators & Catalysts for Change by Elizabeth J. Skinner


Visually Impaired/Blind

A person with a visual impairment or low vision has a severe reduction in vision that cannot be corrected with standard glasses or contact lenses and reduces the person’s ability to function at certain or all tasks.

New York Library Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Do you want to listen to the newspaper on the radio? Would a book holder make your life easier? How about a closed captioned decoder or a magnifying sheet? Do you have a question about current ADA standards or local services for the physically handicapped? Call 563-5190 to find out more! An updated "Guide to Library Services" is available on the web site of the New York State Talking Book and Braille Library. This is a brief, two-page introduction to using Talking Book services and what to expect when registration is completed. The NYSTBBL is a great FREE service for patrons who are not able to use traditional print materials. Please see the New York State Library Talking Book and Braille Library website to link to the guide and other promotional materials. If you have questions about the service, please contact Karen Batchelder at CEFLS.

Be My Eyes Be My Eyes is an app that connects blind and visually impaired with sighted helpers from around the world via live video connection.

Website Design Comparative Formats PDF by Debra Buell

ADA Signage in Libraries


2-1-1

2-1-1 is an easy-to-remember telephone number to call for free, confidential information and referral.  2-1-1 Adirondack Region provides direct, personal and professional assistance for human services and is a vital resource to connect people with important services and volunteer opportunities.


Contact Us

Julie Wever Outreach Coordinator (518) 563-5190 ext. 18 jwever@cefls.org
Karen Batchelder Principal Library Clerk (518) 563-5190 ext. 20 kbatchelder@cefls.org
David Fuller Senior Library Clerk (518) 563-5190 ext. 22 dfuller@cefls.org

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